Attractions

  • Venezia

    Address:
    Piazza San Marco, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    Piazza San Marco often known in English as St Mark's Square, is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is generally known just as la Piazza ("the Square"). All other urban spaces in the city (except the Piazzetta and the Piazzale Roma) are called campi 

  • Murano

    Address:
    Murano, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    Murano's reputation as a center for glassmaking was born when the Venetian Republic fearing fire and the destruction of the city's mostly wooden buildings, ordered glassmakers to move their furnaces to Murano in 1291. Murano glass is still associated with Venetian glass.

  • Burano

    Address:
    Burano, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    The island was probably settled by the Romans, and in the 6th century was occupied by people from Altino, who named it for one of the gates of their former city. Two stories are attributed to how the city obtained its name. One is that it was initially founded by the Buriana family, and another is that the first settlers of Burano came from the small island of Buranello, about 8 kilometres (5 miles) to the south

  • Venezia Marco Polo Airport

    Address:
    Viale Galileo Galilei, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    Venice Divian Apartments is 10 minutes by car from Marco Polo Airport. 

  • Venezia Santa Lucia Train Station

    Address:
    Stazione di Venezia Santa Lucia, Venice, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    Venice Divian Apartments is about 15 minutes by bus from Venezia Historical Center 

  • Padova Cappella degli Scrovegni - Giotto

    Address:
    Cappella degli Scrovegni, Piazza Eremitani, Padova, Province of Padua, Italy .

    The Scrovegni Chapel (ItalianCappella degli Scrovegni [kapˈpɛlla deʎʎi skroˈveɲɲi]), also known as the Arena Chapel, is a small church, adjacent to the Augustinian monastery, the Monastero degli Eremitani in Padua, region of VenetoItaly. The chapel and monastery are now part of the complex of the Museo Civico of Padua.

    The chapel contains a fresco cycle by Giotto, completed about 1305 and considered to be an important masterpiece of Western art.

    Giotto and his team covered all the internal surfaces of the chapel with frescoes, including the walls and the ceiling. The nave is 20.88 metres long, 8.41 metres wide, and 12.65 metres high. The apse area is composed of a square area (4.49 meters deep and 4.31 meters wide) and a pentagonal area (2.57 meters deep). The largest element is extensive cycles showing the Life of Christ and the Life of the Virgin. The wall at the rear of the church, through which the chapel is entered, has a large Last Judgement. There are also panels in grisaille (monochrome) showing the Vices and Virtues.

    The church was dedicated to Santa Maria della Carità at the Feast of the Annunciation, 1303, and consecrated in 1305. Much of Giotto's fresco cycle focuses on the life of the Virgin Mary and celebrates her role in human salvation. A motet by Marchetto da Padova appears to have been composed for the dedication on 25 March 1305.[2] The chapel is also known as the Arena Chapel because it was built on land purchased by Enrico Scrovegni that abutted the site of a Roman arena. The space was where an open-air procession and sacred representation of the Annunciation to the Virgin had been played out for a generation before the chapel was built.[3]

     

  • Riviera del Brenta - Villa Pisani

    Address:
    Villa Pisani, Via Doge Pisani, Stra, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy .

    Villa Pisani at Stra refers to the monumental, late-Baroque rural palace located along the Brenta Canal (Riviera del Brenta) at Via Doge Pisani 7 near the town of Stra, on the mainland of the Veneto, northern Italy. This villa is one of the largest examples of Villa Veneta located in the Riviera del Brenta, the canal linking Venice to Padua. The patrician Pisani family of Venice commissioned a number of villas, also known as Villa Pisani across the Venetian mainland. The villa and gardens now operate as a national museum, and the site sponsors art exhibitions.

    Construction of this palace was begun in the early 18th century for Alvise Pisani, the most prominent member of the Pisani family, who was appointed doge in 1735. The initial models of the palace by Paduan architect Girolamo Frigimelica still exist, but the design of the main building was ultimately completed by Francesco Maria Preti. When it was completed, the building had 114 rooms, in honour of its owner, the 114th Doge of Venice Alvise Pisani.[1]

    In 1807 it was bought by Napoleon from the Pisani Family, now in poverty due to great losses in gambling. In 1814 the building became the property of the House of Habsburg who transformed the villa into a place of vacation for the European aristocracy of that period. In 1934 it was partially restored to host the first meeting of Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini, after the riots in Austria.